why climb ?

 

High School Programs

The high school is a great place to introduce tree climbing because the students will be more mature and able to meet more of the tree climbing challenges, like high climbing and tree top camping. They will also be more responsible which can open up more possibilities.

Tree climbing will attract teenagers who have a desire to be independent. Tree climbing is an individual act even though the activity has its social aspects. A climber is on their own while ascending. They may relate to other climbers but they alone are in control.

Climbing will attract many rebels and risk takers. Many high school students get bored with school activities and often turn to more stimulating and sometimes dangerous pursuits. The rebels and risk takers often cause trouble in school and are sometimes frowned on. But it often falls on the risk takers and rebels to bring about social change when they enter the adult business world. Tree climbing can offer them a chance to be unusual in a stimulating environment.

What do the students get out of it? Here's a few benefits the youth will receive.

 

1.

The upper torso gets a thorough workout. The arms, hands, back, neck and stomach get conditioned through rope climbing. The good part about the exercise is that it is fun and no prodding is needed to initiate participation.

 

2.

Here's an activity that increases one's confidence by getting immediate feedback on one's performance. If you are working the knots correctly, you immediately gain height. It really does not matter how fast you are going, as long as you are going up. It gives a young person a feeling of "I can" which is so important in moving through life. This is especially true with young women.

 

3.

Once a person has successfully climbed once, they are in a position to support and cheer others on as they climb for their first time. When a person shares with another, their feeling of self worth rises. It only takes one short climb to have a feeling of completion.

 

4.

It's much easier to share with others if you have a common ground to meet on. It's even more easy to share if the common ground is based on having fun together.

 

5.

This is achieved through sharing and common grounds.

 

6.

Tree climbing is a sharing experience. It's not a competing experience. The fun is getting everyone up into the tree, not getting there first.

 

7.

You have to work the knots in a sequential process or you don't go higher. First one knot is moved then another is moved. Leave out one of the sequences and you are grounded.

 

8.

You don't get to your intended target without keeping with the program. No need for the instructor to tell the new climber about persistence because it will be apparent. If you stop moving the knots up, you cease to climb. Persistence is learned in an atmosphere of excitement as opposed to a judgmental environment.

 

9.

The rope is looped over a branch and that is the goal; to touch the branch. Sometimes a bell is hung to ring or the climber might find a small bottle of bubbles to blow on those below. The main point is a recognizable goal was achieved and that brings a mountain of satisfaction to the climber involved, be they kid or adult.

 

10.

A large tree will usually support ten climbing stations. If you have a group over ten in number then there will be some left to watch and shout support to those climbing. Everybody wants everyone to succeed. It's natural in a tree climbing group.

 

11.

Here's an opportunity to practice leadership through preparing for a climb, executing a climb, and completing a climb. There is a lot to be done when a group goes out for an excursion or spending a night out high in a tree. Leadership is exchanged between climbers so all can get a taste of what the real world is like.

 

12.

Teens best teach each other. A teen climber is immediately enlisted in teaching climbing skills to the new climber when they have reached a certain level of climbing expertise. The act of teaching involves great amounts of trust and this bonds the climbers even closer together.




Tree climbing can be introduced in many ways. It could appear as an after school program or you might attach tree climbing to the Physical Education curriculum during school hours.

Many high schools have their own outdoor adventure program. This would make a good addition to the activities or it could be a stand alone activity if there was enough interest. An Explorers Post could also be established or tree climbing could be added to an existing program. There are many possibilities.





Corporations and Tree Climbing

Corporate people climbing trees? Why not? Many corporations are wise to include a fitness and adventure program available to their employees and families. It's good business to have corporate members with their colleagues or families relating to each other in a stimulating environment such as the outdoors.

Most corporate facilities have trees growing on their site or have some growing nearby. Some of these trees are large and well suited for group climbs. Why build something artificial to climb when it could very well be as close as the nearest tree?

What can tree climbing offer the corporate world? Plenty. Let's look at some of the possibilities.

Tree climbing is easily applied to a team pursuit. Most corporate people will enter technical tree climbing using a rope and harness as a new activity.

This presents an opportunity to work in a fun, stimulating environment and practicing some group dynamics while learning. Here are a few important subjects that relate to the work place and parallel with the process of tree climbing.

 

1.

One can always learn new material by oneself but it is much more effective and more fun if done with other people. Learning new material together builds a strong foundation for building social and technical skills, not to mention the time for evaluation and relaxation afterwards.

 

2.

Here's an activity that increases one's confidence by getting immediate feedback on one's performance. If you are working the knots correctly, you immediately gain height. It really does not matter how fast you are going, as long as you are going up. It gives a young person a feeling of "I can" which is so important in moving through life. This is especially true with young women.

 

3.

Events do not always follow one's plans. Placing a rope over a high branch rarely happens on the first attempt. One might need to aim lower or with more accuracy.

 

4.

One will always excel and lack in different areas. Accuracy in placing a line high in a tree might be easy but pulling up into the tree could present a difficult task.

 

5.

Stuff happens. Sudden unforeseen events can make one scramble. Getting too close to a creature's nest could bring out the wrath of a protective parent.

 

6.

One must be creative to solve problems. Few climbs are straight to the top without route changes and detours.

 

7.

One can not expect standing above others in excellence without taking risks. The highest branch might not support one's weight.

 

8.

Climbing alone is dangerous. The person who ties on the tools to be used aloft saves the climber from fatigue by not having to climb up and down. Everyone is important on a climbing team.

 

9.

One must be careful when leaving the world of inertia to do battle with gravity. The lead climber can break a dead branch and endanger all of those below.

 

10.

Not everyone has all the answers. Different viewpoints can save enterprises.

 

11.

Some people will outperform others in different skills. One climber might have superior skills climbing between the branches while another could be faced with a dilemma. Skill levels does not make a team member wrong. The wise leader will recognize a team member's strengths and use them wisely to accomplish the goal.

 

12.

The more experienced climber will then look for opportunities to take their friends into the trees for a shared experience. This opens the opportunity to practice leadership skills which can make an influence in the work place.

 
 

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